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'The End' Is Beginning For First-Time Novelist

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'The End' Is Beginning For First-Time Novelist

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'The End' Is Beginning For First-Time Novelist

'The End' Is Beginning For First-Time Novelist

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When a first-time novelist hears his work compared to Saul Bellow, Virginia Wolfe, William Faulkner, even James Joyce, it must be both gratifying, and daunting. Such is the case with Salvatore Scibona, whose novel The End is a finalist for the National Book Award, to be given out next week. Starting at an Italian street festival in 1953, Scibona follows his characters (a baker, a seamstress, a jeweler and an abortionist among them) back and forth through the first half of the 20th century — a period that encompasses war, the Great Depression and the immigration experience.

Guest host Lynn Neary talks with author Salvatore Scibona about his first novel.

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