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Census Bureau Needs Temporary Workers

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Census Bureau Needs Temporary Workers

U.S.

Census Bureau Needs Temporary Workers

Census Bureau Needs Temporary Workers

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The Census Bureau is recruiting people to help with the next big population count — the 2010 Census. It's hiring about 140,000 workers to help update address lists. After the census is mailed out in 2010, the bureau plans to hire about a million people to follow up with residents who don't mail back the form.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is about an organization that's actually hiring more than a million temp workers over the next two years. The word is Census Bureau. The bureau is recruiting people to help with the next big population count in 2010. It's now hiring about 140,000 workers to help update address lists.

Mr. DWIGHT DEAN (Director, Detroit Regional Office, Census Bureau): We're hiring people to drive every road, take a look at our list, and compare it to what is actually on the land, looking for every residential structure that's out there.

MONTAGNE: Dwight Dean is with the Census Bureau's Detroit office. He says here's what you need to do the job.

Mr. DEAN: It's probably not the skill level that we're interested in as much as knowledge of the locality. We try to hire people from a local area to perform the work right in that local area.

MONTAGNE: And after the census is mailed out in 2010, the bureau plans to hire about a million people to follow up with residents who don't mail back the form - all those people out there. And that's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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