Politics

Michelle Obama: More Than 'Mom-In-Chief'?

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Michelle, Malia and Sasha Obama i

Michelle Obama, pictured above with her daughters Malia (left) and Sasha, has said that she has "had to juggle being Mom-in-Chief and having a career for a long time." Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
Michelle, Malia and Sasha Obama

Michelle Obama, pictured above with her daughters Malia (left) and Sasha, has said that she has "had to juggle being Mom-in-Chief and having a career for a long time."

Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Michelle Obama has a very impressive resume — she's an attorney with degrees from both Harvard Law and Princeton — and yet much of the media attention she receives has to do with her clothes. The next first lady has said that her first priority when she gets to the White House will be to act as "Mom-in-Chief."

"The primary focus for the first year will be making sure that the kids make it through the transition," Michelle Obama told Steve Kroft in a Nov. 16 CBS interview. "But there are many issues that I care deeply about. I care about military families and the work/family balance issue. I care about education. I, both Barack and I, believe that we can have an impact in the D.C. area.

Guests and callers weigh in on Michelle Obama's very public balancing act, and the many competing pressures of being America's First Lady.

Guests:

Michelle Martin, host of NPR's Tell Me More; her commentary, "What Michelle Obama Is Giving Up", aired Nov. 17.

Rebecca Traister, author of "The momification of Michelle Obama", published Nov. 12 on Salon.com.

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