Hugh Hefner on a Life Less Ordinary

Hugh Hefner portrait i i

Hefner, at 81, is still Playboy magazine's editor in chief. Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images
Hugh Hefner portrait

Hefner, at 81, is still Playboy magazine's editor in chief.

Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images
Hugh Hefner on his plan in 1970. i i

Hugh Hefner relaxes aboard his private plane with model and actor Barbi Benton in 1970. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hugh Hefner on his plan in 1970.

Hugh Hefner relaxes aboard his private plane with model and actor Barbi Benton in 1970.

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Before he was Hef, Hugh Marston Hefner was the son of a couple from Nebraska, growing up on Chicago's Westside, at a time when it was still surrounded by prairie. Today, the sex guru hardly needs an introduction.

It's been more than five decades since he first launched Playboy magazine. He's lived through the cultural shifts of the 1950s and '60s, from the age of jazz to the world of rock and hip-hop.

How did Hefner make the transition through decades of cultural changes when others couldn't? Case in point: a new reality show, The Girls Next Door chronicles the lives of Hefner's three blonde live-in girlfriends. The shows demographics may surprise some; viewers are 70 percent female, and most of them are younger women.

Hefner, now 81, talks with Renee Montagne at the Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles.

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