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Retired Officers Seek To End 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'

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Retired Officers Seek To End 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'

Retired Officers Seek To End 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'

Retired Officers Seek To End 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/97409464/97410719" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than 100 retired generals and admirals have signed an open letter to President-elect Barack Obama calling for an end to the military's controversial "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy regarding gays in the armed forces. The letter, "104 Generals and Admirals: Gay Ban Must End" was put out by the Palm Center of the University of California-Santa Barbara.

Rear Admiral James Barnett (ret.) discusses why he signed the open letter, and why his views have changed since the policy's inception under Bill Clinton in 1993.