Thanksgiving Holiday: The Road Less Traveled

The Automobile Association of America says thanks to the economy, holiday travel could decline for the first time in six years. About 600,000 people are expected to forego the annual trek to be with family and friends this Thanksgiving weekend. That's despite lower gas prices, which are under $2 a gallon in many parts of the country. AAA says about 41 million people are expected to take trips of at least 50 miles during the holiday.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business has nothing to do with driving. The word is home-cooked turkey. The auto club AAA says thanks to the economy we could see the first decline in holiday travel in six years. About 600,000 people are expected to forgo the annual trek to be with family and friends this Thanksgiving weekend. That's despite lower gas prices, which are now under $2 a gallon in many parts of the country. Still, about 41 million people will be travelling, and you get a chance to join them later today and tomorrow on the road, at airports, at crowded bus and train stations. That's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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