Turkey Dinner's Carbon Footprint

Most likely your turkey traveled by truck to get to your grocer. That trip probably started in a state like Minnesota or North Carolina, which are leading turkey producers. The cranberries are most likely from Wisconsin or Massachusetts, two states that produce more than 80 percent of the nation's cranberries. But the National Resources Defense Council suggests that many ingredients for Thanksgiving dinner can be found at local farmers markets.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

If you're adding up the dollars you're spending this holiday, you may also want to consider a different kind of cost, the cost in pollution of getting that holiday dinner to your home. On this Thanksgiving, our last word in business is carbon wing print. Your turkey, of course, did not fly to your table, but it likely did travel by truck to get to the grocer. And that trip probably started in a state like Minnesota or North Carolina, which are leading turkey producers. So if you're a long way away from Minnesota or North Carolina, there's a big carbon footprint.

Your cranberries are most likely from Wisconsin or Massachusetts, which together produce more than 80 percent of them in the United States. Now the Natural Resources Defense Council, which monitors things like this, says it doesn't have to be this way. Many ingredients for Thanksgiving dinner can be found at local farmers' markets. Even turkeys can be found locally on Web sites like localharvest.org. And that's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.