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Cyber Monday: Click Till You Drop

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Cyber Monday: Click Till You Drop

Business

Cyber Monday: Click Till You Drop

Cyber Monday: Click Till You Drop

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/97583135/97583096" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Retailers came up with the concept of Cyber Monday three years ago when online merchants offer big bargains. Monday is when workers are back in the office after Thanksgiving, and can shop online at their desks. According to a recent survey, three out of 10 workers plan to holiday shop while on the job. But employee beware: According to that same poll, half the employers surveyed said they'll monitor workers' Internet use.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Many retailers are hoping for a busy shopping weekend and an even busier Monday, which provides us with our last word in business today. Cyber Monday - retailers came up with that concept three years ago. It's the day that online merchants offer big bargains. Monday is when workers are back in the office after Thanksgiving and can shop online at their desks. And according to a recent survey, three out of 10 workers plan to holiday shop while at work. Why use up your personal time with this stuff? The survey from the online job site careerbuilder.com - why is this survey coming from careerbuilder.com?

Do you build your career by shopping at work? Never mind. Anyway, this survey says that of those who plan to shop online from work, nearly a quarter expect to spend two hours or more; 13 percent predict they will spend three hours or more. But employees beware because according to that same poll, half the employers surveyed said they monitor the Internet use of their workers. And that's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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