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A Political Place For Evangelicals

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A Political Place For Evangelicals

Politics

A Political Place For Evangelicals

A Political Place For Evangelicals

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John McCain's choice of Sarah Palin as his running mate was meant, in part, to energize the Republican Party's conservative base, which in no small part includes evangelical Christians. While many evangelicals did support the McCain-Palin ticket, their votes weren't enough to overcome those of independents and Republicans who came out for Barack Obama and Joe Biden.

Host Liane Hansen speaks to Richard Cizik, vice president of governmental affairs for the National Association of Evangelicals, and the Rev. Luis Cortes, president of Esperanza, the largest Hispanic faith-based organization in the country, about the political future for evangelicals.

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