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Mumbai's Leopold Cafe Lives To Tell Tale

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Mumbai's Leopold Cafe Lives To Tell Tale

World

Mumbai's Leopold Cafe Lives To Tell Tale

Mumbai's Leopold Cafe Lives To Tell Tale

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/97661109/97661387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Farhang Jehani, a co-owner of Leopold Cafe in Mumbai, India, says he would like to see more security in the wake of the attacks in the city that killed nearly 200 people. The cafe, which is popular with tourists and was one of the targets of last Wednesday's attack, reopened Monday. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Farhang Jehani, a co-owner of Leopold Cafe in Mumbai, India, says he would like to see more security in the wake of the attacks in the city that killed nearly 200 people. The cafe, which is popular with tourists and was one of the targets of last Wednesday's attack, reopened Monday.

Andrea Hsu/NPR

Bullet holes mark the walls and there is a hole in the floor where a grenade landed, but but Leopold Cafe in Mumbai, India, has reopened for business.

The popular stop for Western tourists was attacked last Wednesday by gunmen who killed seven people at the cafe, including two waiters, and injured several others.

Farhang Jehani, a co-owner of Leopold Cafe, says cleaning up the cafe took at least five attempts because of the blood that was left behind after the attack.

He says since its reopening Monday, the restaurant has been packed with both tourists and locals.

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