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Ackerman, Science Fiction Legend

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Ackerman, Science Fiction Legend

Remembrances

Ackerman, Science Fiction Legend

Ackerman, Science Fiction Legend

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The man credited with coining the phrase "sci-fi" died this week at the age of 92. Host Andrea Seabrook has this remembrance of Forrest J. Ackerman.

ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

A science fiction legend died this week, the man who coined the phrase sci-fi. His name, Forrest J. Ackerman. He was 92. He was a writer, literary agent, and the force behind the magazine Famous Monsters of Film Land. Ackerman discovered the writer Ray Bradbury, and he amassed a mind-boggling collection of sci-fi and fantasy artifacts - Mr. Spock's pointy ears, Bela Lugosi's Dracula cape, and the pterodactyl that swooped in for Fay Wray in King Kong.

Forrest Ackerman once told the Los Angeles Times how he came up with the phrase sci-fi. It was 1954, he said. My wife and I were listening to the radio, and when someone said the word hi-fi, the word sci-fi suddenly hit me. If my interests had been soap operas, I guess it would have been cry-fi or James Bond, spy-fi. Forrest J. Ackerman died Thursday of heart failure. He was 92. This is NPR, National Public Radio.

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