Guatemalan Official: Burning Devil Dirties The Air

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Vendors sell hundreds of thousands of devil pinatas in the days leading up to Dec. 7. i

Vendors sell hundreds of thousands of devil pinatas in the days leading up to Dec. 7, when Guatemalans burn devil figures to banish bad spirits and celebrate the beginning of the Christmas season. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John Burnett/NPR
Vendors sell hundreds of thousands of devil pinatas in the days leading up to Dec. 7.

Vendors sell hundreds of thousands of devil pinatas in the days leading up to Dec. 7, when Guatemalans burn devil figures to banish bad spirits and celebrate the beginning of the Christmas season.

John Burnett/NPR

Guatemalans on Sunday celebrated a beloved tradition: "Burning of the Devil." Across the country, people lit bonfires and burned figures of Satan as a way to symbolically cleanse their houses. But the minister of the environment, for the first time, had asked Guatemalans not to burn the devils because it pollutes the air.

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