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A New Federal Writers Project

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A New Federal Writers Project

U.S.

A New Federal Writers Project

A New Federal Writers Project

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/98134230/98134203" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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This photo of destitute pea pickers in Nipomo, California, taken in 1936, was made possible by the Federal Writers Project. Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress Archives hide caption

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Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress Archives

This photo of destitute pea pickers in Nipomo, California, taken in 1936, was made possible by the Federal Writers Project.

Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress Archives

President-elect Barack Obama's plan to invest in the country's infrastructure harkens back to the New Deal. Writer and longtime journalist Mark Pinsky suggests in his article on The New Republic's Web site that Mr. Obama take his plan one step farther and create a new Federal Writers Project. The original program ran from 1935 to 1939 and provided employment to more than 6,000 writers, photographers, editors, and critics who traveled around the country documenting people's lives. Alex Cohen talks with Pinsky about his idea.