NPR logo
You Too Can Throw A Shoe At President Bush
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/98437874/98437873" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
You Too Can Throw A Shoe At President Bush

Diversions

You Too Can Throw A Shoe At President Bush

You Too Can Throw A Shoe At President Bush
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/98437874/98437873" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Bush's quick reflexes spared him getting hit by a shoe hurled at him in Baghdad. But shoe throwers around the world can take their turn at the president's likeness. In a new online game called Sock and Awe, players aim a brown topsider at a ducking President Bush. It's much like a carnival game, with the president's face popping up from behind a wide lectern. Players earn a point for every shoe that makes a direct hit.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. President Bush's quick reflexes spared him getting smacked by a shoe hurled at him in Baghdad. Now shoe throwers around the world can take their turn at the president's likeness. In a new online game called "Sock and Awe," players aim a brown topsider at a ducking president. It's much like a carnival game with a moving target, with Mr. Bush's face popping up from behind a wide podium. Players earn a point for every shoe that makes a hit. It's Morning Edition.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Related NPR Stories

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.