Looking For Moxie, And Finding It

Correspondent Ketzel Levine found that her own story dovetailed with a series about setbacks. i i

Correspondent Ketzel Levine found that her own story dovetailed with a series about Americans facing setbacks at work. Serena Davidson hide caption

itoggle caption Serena Davidson
Correspondent Ketzel Levine found that her own story dovetailed with a series about setbacks.

Correspondent Ketzel Levine found that her own story dovetailed with a series about Americans facing setbacks at work.

Serena Davidson

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My name is Ketzel Levine. I'm a senior correspondent for National Public Radio — and as a direct result of the current economic crisis, I have been been laid off from my job.

I was told almost two weeks ago, but it's only today that I'm sane enough to tell you. I've been spending most of my time careening around the five stages of grief — doing each of them a disservice, I might add. But I figure there'll be time enough later to revisit each one at least a few more times.

Meanwhile, here's what I know about moxie: It is a magical elixir, just as advertised in the 1870s when it was brewed from botanicals like the gentian root, a sublime plant with an otherworldly blue bloom.

The thing about gentians — all flowers, really — is that they're easy to miss if you're not paying attention. You could be standing in acres of pulsing blue and see absolutely nothing if you're lost in your own panic, grief or rage.

So I say — at least in my finer moments — the hell with that! I love blue flowers. And I can't live without the magic.

So bartender, make it a moxie. Straight up. On second thought, make it a double.

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