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Milan's Homeless Will Be Treated To Caviar

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Milan's Homeless Will Be Treated To Caviar

Business

Milan's Homeless Will Be Treated To Caviar

Milan's Homeless Will Be Treated To Caviar

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Italian police were wondering what to do with nearly 90 pounds of beluga caviar seized last month from smugglers. It's worth more than a half-million dollars. Rather than let it rot in police refrigerators, the fancy fish eggs will go to local soup kitchens and rest homes. A priest at a charity home in Milan told an Italian newspaper that they welcome everything that comes their way, but "most of our guests don't even know what those little black balls are."

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our Last Word in Business today is, let them eat caviar. Italian police were wondering what to do with 90 pounds of Beluga caviar seized last month from smugglers. It's worth more than half a million dollars. Rather than let it rot in their police refrigerators, the fancy fish eggs will go to local soup kitchens, hopefully not in the soup, and rest homes. A priest at a charity home in Milan told an Italian newspaper he welcomes everything that comes their way but, quote, "most of our guests don't even know what those little black balls are." Perhaps tossing with a little pasta would help.

That's the Business News on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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