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Bush Grants 19 Pardons, Commutes 1 Sentence

NPR's Peter Overby reports on the pardons, on 'Morning Edition'
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President Bush granted 19 pardons and commuted one prison sentence before leaving for the Christmas holiday on Tuesday, but none of the actions involved high-profile individuals.

The latest list included a posthumous pardon for Charles Winters, who aided the Jewish resistance in the 1940s. Winters, who died in the 1980s, helped ship arms and aircraft to Jews who were trying to establish their own state in the Middle East.

He was convicted of violating the Neutrality Act and served 18 months in prison.

Only one other person has received a posthumous presidential pardon in recent times: Henry O. Flipper, the first black graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, who was drummed out of the Army after white officers mistakenly accused him of embezzling about $3,800.

In addition to Winters, others granted pardons were: William Alvis III, of Flushing, Ohio; John Allen Aregood of Riviera, Texas; Eric Charles Blanke of Parker, Colo.; Steve Doyle Cavender of The Villages, Fla.; Marie Elena Eppens of Lynden, Wash.; Lydia Lee Ferguson of Sun City, Ariz.; Eduviges Duvi Gonzalez-Matsumura of Clovis, Calif.; George Clarence Greene Jr. of Gray, Ga.; James Won Hee Kang of South Barrington, Ill.; Alan Stephen Maiss of Reno, Nev.; Richard Harold Miller of Tallahassee, Fla.; Delano Abraham Nixon of Neosho Rapids, Kan.; John H. Overholt of Black Hawk, S.D.; Morris Keith Parker of Georgetown, S.C.; Robert Truman Reece of Redondo Beach, Calif.; Donald Edward Roessler of Harrison, Ohio; Issac Robert Toussie of Brooklyn, N.Y.; and David Lane Woolsey of St. George, Utah.

The president also commuted the prison sentence of Reed Raymond Prior of Des Moines, Iowa.

From wire reports

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