On Wall Street, Christmas Eve Tradition Gives Hope Like every year, at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, everyone on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange stopped to sing Wait 'Til the Sun Shines, Nellie. Ted Weisberg, president of Seaport Securities and a floor trader at the exchange, talks about the resonance the song has this year.
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On Wall Street, Christmas Eve Tradition Gives Hope

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On Wall Street, Christmas Eve Tradition Gives Hope

On Wall Street, Christmas Eve Tradition Gives Hope

On Wall Street, Christmas Eve Tradition Gives Hope

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  • Transcript

Like every year, at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, everyone on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange stopped to sing Wait 'Til the Sun Shines, Nellie.

"It's been — in one form or another — going on for probably more than a 100 years," Ted Weisberg, president of Seaport Securities and a floor trader at the exchange, tells NPR's Robert Siegel.

Weisberg says the tradition is repeated on New Year's Eve.

He says the song brings a smile and hope to everybody.

"The singing and sometimes the frivolity and the jokes is really an outlet for the stress and the emotion, which is with us every day no matter what the market is doing, " Weisberg says.

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