Court Forces Utah Family To Return Baby To Tribe

Heather Larson and her son Kade look at a picture of baby Talon Larson. i i

Heather Larson and her son Kade look at a picture of baby Talon Larson. The Larsons adopted Talon, and then were forced to return him to his birth mother. Jenny Brundin for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jenny Brundin for NPR
Heather Larson and her son Kade look at a picture of baby Talon Larson.

Heather Larson and her son Kade look at a picture of baby Talon Larson. The Larsons adopted Talon, and then were forced to return him to his birth mother.

Jenny Brundin for NPR

A couple in Utah adopted a son 6 months ago, but the courts have forced them to return the baby to his birth mother, a member of the Ojibwe American Indian tribe, in a complicated and emotional case.

How are families affected by a federal adoption law called the Indian Child Welfare Act, passed 30 years ago, that is aimed at keeping Native American culture alive?

Jenny Brundin reports for member station KUER in Salt Lake City.

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