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Good Riddance Day Shreds Bad Memories

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Good Riddance Day Shreds Bad Memories

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Good Riddance Day Shreds Bad Memories

Good Riddance Day Shreds Bad Memories

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In New York's Times Square Sunday it was literally out with the old. New Yorkers and tourists gathered to shred bad memories from 2008 at the second annual "Good Riddance Day." There was an industrial-sized shredder for a public year-end purge: Bank statements, check stubs and worthless stock certificates. The prize for the most creative object to shred: A sock without a mate.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Some New Yorkers took the saying "out with the old" literally. They gathered in Times Square yesterday to shred bad memories from 2008 at the second annual Good Riddance Day. An industrial-sized shredder offered a public year-end purge: bank statements, check stubs and worthless stock certificates, a printout of that break-up email. Bye-bye. But the prize for the most creative object: a sock without a mate. It's Morning Edition.

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