Cambridge, Mass. Adopts Plan to Go Green Cambridge, Mass., announces a plan to cut electricity use and greenhouse-gas emissions in the city. The plan will offer energy audits and cheap loans to homes, businesses and schools for installing low-energy light bulbs, insulation and more-efficient heating and cooling systems.
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Cambridge, Mass. Adopts Plan to Go Green

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Cambridge, Mass. Adopts Plan to Go Green

Cambridge, Mass. Adopts Plan to Go Green

Cambridge, Mass. Adopts Plan to Go Green

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9878790/9878791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cambridge, Mass., announces a plan to cut electricity use and greenhouse-gas emissions in the city. The plan will offer energy audits and cheap loans to homes, businesses and schools for installing low-energy light bulbs, insulation and more-efficient heating and cooling systems.

Susan Hockfield, president, professor of neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Rob Pratt, senior vice-president, Henry P. Kendall Foundation

Susanne Rasmussen, director, environmental and transportation planning, City of Cambridge

John Spengler, co-chair, Harvard Green Campus Initiative; Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation; director, environmental science and engineering program, School of Public Health, Harvard University

Rick Mattila, director, environmental affairs, Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, Mass.