An Elephant Seal Terrorizes California

There's an aggressive elephant seal on the loose in California. Nibbles, as he's known, has bitten a surfer, a kayaker and killed a dozen harbor seals. Apparently, the young male seal has been unlucky in love and is not happy about it.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Surfers have to guard against shark bites, wicked(ph) under toes and jellyfish. Now at least on a small stretch of California also a love-crazed elephant seal. A male elephant seal, which been nicknamed Nibbles who splashes around the mouth of California's Russian River, has killed a dozen harbor seals, bit the leg of a surfer, a kayaker and recently leapt out of the water to sink his teeth into a pit bull named Sativa(ph).

Daters and boaters are being warned not to swim along that stretch. Kathy Lowry(ph), who witnessed the attack on Sativa said, I saw the elephant seal come out of the water like a torpedo, angled down on the dog and landed on him. Somehow, the dog wriggled out and squared off with the seal.

Joe Cordaro, a wildlife biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service, says that Nibbles is reacting like a typical frustrated male. It happens sometimes when the youngest plays bull with high testosterone levels, he says. They try to establish a new territory and mate with whatever they come across.

My gosh, what a (unintelligible) feral had been on that beach?

Later in the hour, taste the bouquet and the broccoli and the black fruit, a wine blogger, talks his tray(ph). Stay tuned.

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