Wanted By The FBI: Employees

The FBI has launched one of its biggest hiring blitzes ever. It needs to fill 850 special-agent positions. It also has openings for more than 2,000 support staff. Officials say this is the agency's largest job posting since just after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The openings are largely due to attrition and a wave of retirements.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

OK, so it's a little tougher to find a job at the post office. There is another way that you can find employment, though. Get on the FBI's most wanted list, which might be posted at the post office - no, no, no, no, not that list. There is another list. It's a list of open jobs. And that's the subject of our last word in business today.

The FBI needs to fill 850 special agent positions. It also has openings for more than 2,000 support staff. Officials say this is the agency's largest job posting since just after 9/11. Attrition and a wave of retirements are the reasons. And that means another generation has a chance to search for the people on that other most wanted list. That's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

And I'm Ari Shapiro.

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