NPR logo

Galapagos Surprise Again With Pink Iguana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99211626/99213377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Galapagos Surprise Again With Pink Iguana

Galapagos Surprise Again With Pink Iguana

Galapagos Surprise Again With Pink Iguana

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99211626/99213377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An adult male pink iguana on the rim of the Volcan Wolf crater on Isabela Island in the Galapagos. Gabriele Gentile/PA Wire hide caption

toggle caption
Gabriele Gentile/PA Wire

An adult male pink iguana on the rim of the Volcan Wolf crater on Isabela Island in the Galapagos.

Gabriele Gentile/PA Wire

The Galapagos Islands have been famous for their wildlife ever since Charles Darwin hatched his theories on evolution by studying Galapagos finches.

But Darwin didn't get to all the Galapagos Islands, and more than 20 years ago, scientists hiking on an island known as Isabela spotted an iguana that was pink.

What they didn't know was whether this pink lizard was a genetic mutation or a whole new species.

Host Rebecca Roberts speaks with Howard Snell of the University of New Mexico, one of the co-authors of a new article about this iguana.