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Bay Area Tries to Cope with Massive Traffic Shift
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Bay Area Tries to Cope with Massive Traffic Shift

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Bay Area Tries to Cope with Massive Traffic Shift

Bay Area Tries to Cope with Massive Traffic Shift
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For thousands of commuters in the San Francisco Bay Area, the road home no longer exists. A crucial freeway interchange on the Oakland side of the Bay Bridge was destroyed early Sunday after a gasoline tanker truck exploded.

Even though a huge section of the freeway is now just a mass of concrete and melted steel, the Bay Area's morning commute was easier than expected.

The two downed freeways didn't directly impact flow into San Francisco Monday, but commuters coming out of the city will find their journey east more complicated.

Transit officials say that clean-up could be completed in two days, but they won't speculate how long repairs will take. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has declared an emergency, which streamlines contracting and environmental regulations.

Transit officials and commuters had more than 24 hours to plan alternative routes and ways to get to work. More buses and ferries were pressed into service, and all public transit was free for the day.

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