Dodger Fans Offered 'All You Can Eat' Option

The Los Angeles Dodgers are now offering "all you can eat" seats at home games. For about $40, you get all the Dodger dogs and peanuts you can eat.

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MADELEINE BRAND, host:

Still hungry? Well, head up to Dodger Stadium here in Los Angeles where this season for about $40 a ticket baseball fans can eat to their heart's delight. Okay, so maybe their hearts won't be so delighted.

Here's NPR's Alex Cohen.

Unidentified Man: Yes, there's no doubt (unintelligible).

ALEX COHEN: If you come here at Dodger Stadium all-you-can-eat pavilion there are some rules, like only four Dodger dogs per person at a time. What fan Danny Corono(ph) wasn't able to get in hotdogs he made up for with two orders of nachos, several bags of peanuts and some popcorn to top it all off.

Mr. DANNY CORONO (Fan): Hopefully, I don't get stomachache.

COHEN: You're saying that as you stuff bags of peanuts into your pockets.

Mr. CORONO: Peanuts in my pockets and nachos is in my mouth.

COHEN: How much do you think you'd spend if you were just buying this food, how much do you think you would spend at a Dodger game?

Mr. CORONO: I was at the Dodger game yesterday and I spent - right when I came to the game I spent $60 for three people, as a matter of fact.

COHEN: In other sections of the stadium Dodger dogs go for $4.75, soft drinks are $4.50, nachos are $6. Here in the right field pavilion you don't have to eat a whole lot before the ticket practically pays for itself.

Mr. RUBEN DIAZ: My name is Ruben Diaz(ph) from (unintelligible).

COHEN: Can you tell me what you've got so far?

Mr. DIAZ: I got two hotdogs and nachos.

COHEN: That's a very, you know, that's a very moderate start.

Mr. DIAZ: Starting off slow.

(Sound of laughter)

COHEN: How many hotdogs do you think you could eat?

Mr. DIAZ: Maybe five or six.

COHEN: How many do you plan on eating tonight, you know?

Mr. DIAZ: Probably seven or eight.

COHEN: Are you going to get your money's worth?

Mr. DIAZ: I'll make sure I'll get my money's worth.

COHEN: If you don't mind me asking you a personal question, you're a big guy, can I ask you how much you weigh?

Mr. DIAZ: About 380, 390.

COHEN: It wasn't just big guys like Ruben gorging themselves in right field. They were plenty of skinny folks, too, like Melissa Rissop(ph).

Ms. MELISSA RISSOP (Fan): I had two hotdogs. I had a drink. I had some peanuts. (Unintelligible)

COHEN: How many hotdogs do you think you could eat?

Ms. RISSOP: How many nachos do you think I could eat? Or hotdogs…

Unidentified Woman: Four.

Ms. RISSOP: Four?

COHEN: You're a tiny lady. You think you can pack away four?

Ms. RISSOP: I could take on seven…

(Soundbite of laughter)

COHEN: To reach back goal, Melissa would have had to eat at a fairly steady clip. Dodger stadium cuts off the all-you-can-eat frenzy at the seventh inning. And she would have had to miss a good chunk of the game. As the evening progress, the lines for free food at the stands underneath the bleachers had grown long, really long. At the end of one I met Fabian Ochoa(ph) and his buddy.

YEYO: They call me Yeyo(ph), from East L.A.

COHEN: Yeyo, you got a last name?

YEYO: Well, no, just Yeyo, that's it.

COHEN: Yeyo and Fabian had had a few beers, and they were miffed. They had been waiting in line at another one of the food kiosks only to be told that that stand had run out of Dodger dogs.

Mr. YEYO: Three times that we've been here.

Mr. FABIAN OCHOA: (Unintelligible) running out of hotdogs…

COHEN: Are you getting your money's worth right now?

Mr. OCHOA: Not yet.

COHEN: How many hotdogs do you think you need to eat to get your money's worth?

Mr. OCHOA: I can eat about 10.

Mr. YEYO: Like 10 hotdogs?

Mr. OCHOA: Yeah.

COHEN: How would you feel after you've eaten 10 hotdogs?

Mr. OCHOA: Satisfied.

COHEN: One could only hope Fabian would be satisfied after 10 hotdogs, especially considering that amount would pack more than 2,000 calories of fat and more than three times the daily recommended dosage of sodium.

Alex Cohen, NPR News.

BRAND: DAY TO DAY is all-you-can-eat production of NPR News with contributions from Slate.com. I'm Madeleine Brand.

ALEX CHADWICK, host:

And I'm Alex Chadwick.

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