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'Lucifer Effect' Asks Why Good People Go Bad

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'Lucifer Effect' Asks Why Good People Go Bad

'Lucifer Effect' Asks Why Good People Go Bad

'Lucifer Effect' Asks Why Good People Go Bad

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9940824/9940827" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Best known for the landmark Stanford Prison Experiment — in which student volunteers in a mock prison transformed with startling speed into sadistic guards or emotionally broken prisoners — Philip Zimbardo has written a book on the psychology of the unspeakable. It's called The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil.

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