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Advertising Atheism

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Advertising Atheism

Religion

Advertising Atheism

Advertising Atheism

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Recently, placards went up in buses in Washington, D.C., and other cities asking variations on an age-old question: Why believe in God? They're part of a public discussion on humanism and atheism that's gaining momentum thanks in part to books by Sam Harris and Richard Dawkins.

Guests:

Fred Edwords, director of communications of the American Humanist Association. His organization sponsored the "Why believe in a god?" advertisements.

Joellen Murphy, Washington, D.C., resident. She launched a web site, IBelieveToo.org, to raise money to respond to AHA's ads with "Because I created you and I love you" ads.

Jacqueline Salmon, religion reporter for the Washington Post

Why Believe In A God ad.
Courtesy American Humanist Association
Why Believe? ad
Mona Carter
God ads on buses.

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