Helping Crime Victims Heal, Cope, And Find Justice How does being a victim of crime change those who live through it? For insight, Farai Chideya speaks with Lawanda Hawkins — founder of Justice for Murdered Children — and Dr. Michael DeArellano, a clinical psychologist at the National Crime Victims' Research and Treatment Center.
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Helping Crime Victims Heal, Cope, And Find Justice

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Helping Crime Victims Heal, Cope, And Find Justice

Helping Crime Victims Heal, Cope, And Find Justice

Helping Crime Victims Heal, Cope, And Find Justice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99466599/99466586" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How does being a victim of crime change those who live through it? Plus, how best should crime victims begin to heal from resulting psychological scars?

For insight, Farai Chideya speaks with Lawanda Hawkins, founder of Justice for Murdered Children. Her son, Reggie, was killed in December 1995.

She also talks with Dr. Michael DeArellano, a clinical psychologist at the National Crime Victims' Research and Treatment Center based at the Medical University of South Carolina.

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