Inauguration Journey: The Inauguraiders

Also making the trip to D.C. for inauguration are the "Inauguraiders," four youngsters from Northern California armed with cameras and microphones and ready to interview inaugural attendees. These are the nieces and nephews of Chris and Bev Sanders, who will be supervising the young reporters on the Mall on Tuesday.

The journalists got their start in the town one night in a restaurant in the town of Carmel by the Sea. Chris watched as his niece grabbed a video camera and started interviewing customers. "And we noticed right away that everyone engaged with her. Everyone did an interview with her. And I thought — I could never get up and walk through a restaurant with a video camera and get anyone to talk to me," he said.

So the Sanders booked the group on a red-eye flight from California — the entire Row 36, window to window. "God help the people in Row 35," Bev said.

Inauguration Journey: Small-Town Paper's Big Story

Rhonda Hodge and her orange hat. Courtesy Rhonda Hodge i i

hide captionRhonda Hodge and her orange hat.

Courtesy Rhonda Hodge
Rhonda Hodge and her orange hat. Courtesy Rhonda Hodge

Rhonda Hodge and her orange hat.

Courtesy Rhonda Hodge

Among the many journalists covering the inauguration this week will be Rhonda Hodge, who writes for The Murphy Messenger, her hometown paper in Texas. Even though her paper is small and is published only twice a month, Hodge was able to secure press credentials for the event.

"This will be the absolute biggest event I've ever dreamed of covering," she says.

And she's coming prepared. She knit a bright orange wool hat for herself — "in the Jackie Kennedy Onassis pillbox style" — to wear to the inauguration for both fashion and safety. "I want to be seen in the crowd of millions of people," Hodge says, "and if I get stampeded people can say, 'Well the orange hat just went down!' "

Inauguration Journey: Honoring Family

Family photos. i i

hide captionPatricia Lawther will take these photos of her grandfather (left), mother (right) and great-grandmother (top) with her on Inauguration Day.

Courtesy Patricia Lowther
Family photos.

Patricia Lawther will take these photos of her grandfather (left), mother (right) and great-grandmother (top) with her on Inauguration Day.

Courtesy Patricia Lowther

Patricia Lowther from Springfield, Va., is in Washington, D.C., this week for Barack Obama's inauguration. This trip marks a return for Lowther who, along with her mother, marched on Washington for civil rights in 1963.

Her mother didn't live to see Obama elected, so Patricia is bringing three photographs to honor her family: one of her mother, and photos of her grandfather and great-grandmother, both of whom were born into slavery.

"I think the three of them could never ever imagine this person could be elected and would become president," Lowther says.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: