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Inauguration Journey: The Outcast

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Inauguration Journey: The Outcast

Inauguration Journey: The Outcast

Inauguration Journey: The Outcast

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Visitors to Washington, D.C., continue to pour into the city for the inauguration of Barack Obama. One of them is Chuck Latimer from Memphis, Tenn., who won't be joined by any of his family members at the ceremony.

That's because he's the only non-Republican in his family. That led to some tension when it came to finding a place to stay. His sister lives in D.C., and as Latimer says, "When I travel there, I'm always able to stay with her. But this time, she said no. She's really opposed to Obama being elected, but I'm not." This is the first time that Chuck felt like an outcast for his beliefs, and he calls it "political oppression."

So what's a guy to do? Well, he has two plans for where he might stay. If he drives, then his plan is to sleep in the car; and if he flies, he'll just drink a lot of coffee and find a "nook or cranny to sleep in."

On the sibling front, Latimer is still hoping his sister will be able to get over their political differences. "Divisions come between family, but in the end, she's still my family," he says.

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