Presidential John Hancocks Hot Sellers

A company that deals in autographs and manuscripts says presidential signatures are big sellers. Don Prince of History For Sale says the most valuable presidential signature is that of Abraham Lincoln. He says once Barack Obama is president and starts signing documents, those papers could one day be worth a lot of money.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

There is another item with a presidential theme that's likely to retain value, maybe even gain some value, and that is our last word in business today. Presidential signatures are hot items, we're told. That's what we found out from Don Prince of History For Sale, an autograph and manuscript dealer. He says the most valuable presidential signature is that of Abraham Lincoln. Most recently he's been seeing Lincoln go in the two to three hundred thousand dollar range, two or three hundred thousand dollars for a piece of paper that Abraham Lincoln signed.

Mr. Prince says that once Barack Obama is president and starts signing documents, those documents will one day be worth a lot of money. And in fact, he says it's been a boost to the entire category of documents signed by African-American historical figures. That's the business news on Morning Edition. From NPR News, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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