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Bank's Portrait Gallery Honors Presidential Losers

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Bank's Portrait Gallery Honors Presidential Losers

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Bank's Portrait Gallery Honors Presidential Losers

Bank's Portrait Gallery Honors Presidential Losers

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On Inauguration Day, John McCain received an honor he never wanted. His portrait was unveiled on the wall of the First State Bank in Norton, Kan. The bank has a gallery of presidential losers: 59 men who didn't make it to the White House and must face up to defeat. McCain's portrait hangs with those of John Kerry, Walter Mondale and a former longtime senator from Kansas, Bob Dole. McCain's could be the last: The bank says it's out of wall space.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. On Inauguration Day, John McCain received an honor he never wanted. His portrait was unveiled on the wall of the First State Bank in Norton, Kansas. The bank has a gallery of presidential losers, all 59 men who just missed. McCain hangs on the wall alongside such luminaries as John Kerry, Walter Mondale, and the longtime senator from Kansas Bob Dole. And McCain could be the last. The bank says it's out of wall space. It's Morning Edition.

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