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Obama's Bipartisan Speech

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Obama's Bipartisan Speech

Obama's Bipartisan Speech

Obama's Bipartisan Speech

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President Barack Obama has begun his administration on a note of pragmatism and bipartisanship. He speaks as though he has no enemies. It is yet to be seen whether his approach will work.

ROBERT SIEGEL: From NPR News, this is All Things Considered. I'm Robert Siegel. And finally this hour, we're following up on President Obama's Inauguration, on some unusual people who attended and some who couldn't and are not happy about that. But first, our senior news analyst Daniel Schorr has been reflecting on the broader meaning of the new president's words.

DANIEL SCHORR: Internationally, the president has reached out to the Muslim world and offered to extend a hand to those who will unclench their fists. The proffered hand is soon to be tested in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, in Pakistan and in one or more countries in Africa.

SIEGEL: The time is out of joint. Oh, cursed spite, that ever I was born to set it right. This is Daniel Schorr.

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