In China, Starbucks Market Is Piping Hot

China's economy may be slowing, but it is still one of the fastest-growing markets for Starbucks. Since China's Lunar New Year holiday is Monday, Starbucks is tapping further into the market by rolling out a new coffee blend that includes beans grown in China. The company says it's been working with growers in southwestern China, an area is known for coffee production.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

OK. So, China's economy is cooling, but it's still one of the fastest growing markets for Starbucks. Our last word in business today is all the coffee in China. The big Chinese New Year's holiday is this Monday. So, Starbucks is trying to tap in to patriotic palates by rolling out a new blend that includes beans grown in China. The company says it's been working with growers in southwestern China, an area that's known for coffee production. It's not to save money, Starbucks says. It wants local beans on the menu, of course, in hopes of bringing in more customers. A spokeswoman describes the new blend as having gentle acidity, a soft herbal flavor and a cocoa taste. That's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

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