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Volatile Markets? Try Lady Gaga to Calm Down

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Volatile Markets? Try Lady Gaga to Calm Down

Economy

Volatile Markets? Try Lady Gaga to Calm Down

Volatile Markets? Try Lady Gaga to Calm Down

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99767647/99767621" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Phil Maymin, assistant professor of finance and risk engineering at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University, has a theory about the possible correlation between volatility on the trading floor and what's hot on the dance floor.

He has analyzed songs from the Billboard Hot 100 using computer software and what he has found involves beat variance. Songs with a steadier beat or low beat variance seem to be hot when the market is volatile; conversely, songs with high beat variance are popular when the market is calm.

"The key linking idea is mood," he says. "The mood of the people is probably influenced by the market."