NPR logo
Polaroid Still In The Picture, Thanks to New Interest
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99790800/99790772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Polaroid Still In The Picture, Thanks to New Interest

Business

Polaroid Still In The Picture, Thanks to New Interest

Polaroid Still In The Picture, Thanks to New Interest
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99790800/99790772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Polaroid announced last year it would cease production of its instant film, with images that magically appeared. Its imminent demise sparked a global campaign for its survival. Now an Austrian entrepreneur plans to start manufacturing the film at a factory in Holland.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is "instant revival." Polaroid announced last year it would cease production of its instant film. Some people just couldn't bear the idea of never again seeing images magically appear on that iconic white-bordered paper. The imminent death of Polaroid film sparked a global campaign to keep it alive. Now, an Austrian entrepreneur plans to start manufacturing the film at a factory in Holland. Florian Kaps has an established passion for Polaroid. He has a Web site dedicated to Polaroid photography and an art gallery in Vienna dedicated to Polaroid art. He says this project is more than a business plan; quote, "it's a fight against the idea that everything has to die when it doesn't create turnover." And that's the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.