NPR logo

Harley-Davidson Going Over Some Rough Road

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99794265/99793650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Harley-Davidson Going Over Some Rough Road

Business

Harley-Davidson Going Over Some Rough Road

Harley-Davidson Going Over Some Rough Road

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99794265/99793650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The American motorcycle maker announced Friday its sales in 2008 tumbled and it expects 2009 to be another tough year. It plans to cut 1,100 jobs or about 12 percent of its workforce. The cuts will take place over the next two years. The company also plans to close a factory in Wisconsin and consolidate plants as it brings downs production.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business news starts with downshifting at Harley-Davidson.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE:

The American motorcycle maker is going over some rough road. Today, the company said its sales in 2008 tumbled, and it expects 2009 to be another tough year. So Harley-Davidson is cutting 1,100 jobs, about 12 percent of its total workforce. The cuts will take place over the next two years. Harley-Davidson says U.S. sales dropped more than 10 percent last year, though overseas sales are up. Still, the vast majority of Harley-Davidsons are sold here in the U.S. The company also plans to close a factory in Wisconsin and consolidate plants as it brings down production.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.