Story Update: Layoff Victim Starts New Job

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Last Friday, NPR's David Kestenbaum reported on how people were measuring the recession. One of the people mentioned was Terri Weiss of Dayton, Ohio. She was laid off at the beginning of the year from her job with a textbook company. She starts a new job Monday.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And now an update on a story we brought you last Friday. In it, NPR's David Kestenbaum used stories of people to measure the recession. One of those people was Terri Weiss of Dayton, Ohio. She was laid off at the beginning of the year from her job with a textbook company. She paused while speaking with NPR.

Ms. TERRI WEISS: You try to - I'm shutting my door, so the kids can't hear me. I mean, I will probably lose my house.

MONTAGNE: It was a heart-stopping moment. Just hours after our broadcast, she received a new job offer.

Ms. WEISS: That was the first question that my son asked me. If you get the job, do we get to stay in our house?

MONTAGNE: She begins her new job this week, and yes, she hopes to keep the house.

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