Year Of The Ox Not Expected To Be Bullish

The Lunar New Year, which began Monday, is the biggest holiday of the year in China and in many parts of Asia. According to the traditional Chinese calendar, it's the Year of the Ox. Astrologers say ox years are not bullish ones for business and the economy. An ox year last rolled around in 1997, when the Asian financial crisis was unfolding.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Our last word in business today: farewell rat, hello ox. Today is the start of the Lunar New Year. That's the biggest holiday of the year in China and many parts of Asia and in Asian communities in the U.S. According to the traditional Chinese calendar, it's the Year of the Ox. Astrologers say ox years are not bullish ones for business and the economy. You don't need a soothsayer to tell you that. Economists predict the global recession will get worse this year. The last time an ox year rolled around it was 1997. The Asian financial crisis was unfolding.

Still, the ox is said to be a solid and reliable zodiac - not bad in a time of economy uncertainty. Those born in an ox year are seen as hardworking, plodding, and methodical, and they never lose sight of their goals. They include actor George Clooney and President Barack Obama. And that is the business news on Morning Edition from NPR News.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

I'm Renee Montagne.

WERTHEIMER: And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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