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Move Over 'Brangelina,' 'Marack' Is Here

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Move Over 'Brangelina,' 'Marack' Is Here

Move Over 'Brangelina,' 'Marack' Is Here

Move Over 'Brangelina,' 'Marack' Is Here

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/99902577/99902573" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama dance during one of several inaugural balls attended by the couple following his swearing in. SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Barack and Michelle Obama, along with young daughters Sasha and Malia, have brought a new level of celebrity to the White House. Observers of politics and pop culture are taking a strong interest in America's first African-American first family. But the Obamas' celebrity status raises questions about whether the first family should be fodder for the paparazzi.

Cynthia Gordy, White House correspondent for Essence magazine; Bart Landry, a sociology professor at the University of Maryland, and Rob Howe, an editor for People magazine, discuss the new first family's mass appeal.