Copyright ©2007 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

FARAI CHIDEYA, host:

Today, our staff song pick of the week comes from NEWS & NOTES producer Devin Robins. The tune is "Jane Fonda" by Los Angeles rapper Mickey Avalon.

(Soundbite of song, "Jane Fonda")

Mr. MICKEY AVALON (Rapper): (Rapping) I had a baby named Jane, she could shake that thing. Said her daddy used to hang with Johnny Coltrane, she sang at "Soul Train" with a friend named Jen. Her booty was bigger than a Mercedes Benz. Jen was a…

CHIDEYA: Mickey's career is taking off. In March, he opened for the Red Hot Chili Peppers, but life wasn't all so sweet. Both he and his parents were involved in drugs. By his early 20s, he turned to prostitution to fund his heroine habit. But with music, Mickey has found a way to laugh about his past.

(Soundbite of song "Jane Fonda")

Mr. AVALON: (Rapping) I know you wanna do the Jane Fonda. One, two, three, four, get your booty on the dance floor. Work it out, shake it little momma, let me see you do the Jane Fonda. Five, six, seven, now…

CHIDEYA: In February, he appeared on "Love Line," a long-running late night calling show on LA radio station KROQ. Mickey talked about what inspired him to write his hit, Jane Fonda.

Mr. AVALON: My mom and all the other mothers would, you know, do the Jane Fonda workout.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. AVALON: My mom actually went to the place, I mean, she told me recently. I didn't know that, but that, you know, she has the videotapes on Betamax, right? You know, and I mean, it's funny now because my mom also - and she just wrote her biography, or her autobiography, and it's like during that whole time when she was, like, health guru, she actually was like a bulimic.

Unidentified Man: Oh, no.

Mr. AVALON: She got, you know, she had fake boobs and so like without even meaning to, that kind of totally went along with what my, you know, my whole record was about.

(Soundbite of song "Jane Fonda")

Mr. AVALON: (Rapping) One, two, three, four, get your booty on the dance floor. Work it out…

CHIDEYA: Producer Devin Robins isn't watching Avalon's video on Betamax. She's a Stairmaster addict who prefers to hit the gym with Mikey's songs pumping through her headphones.

Here again is "Jane Fonda" by Los Angeles rapper, Mickey Avalon.

(Soundbite of song "Jane Fonda")

Mr. AVALON: (Rapping) I know you wanna do the Jane Fonda. One, two, three, four, get your booty on the dance floor. Work it out, shake it little momma, let me see you do the Jane Fonda. Five, six, seven, now, if you don't know, let me show you how. So work it out, work it little momma. I know you wanna do the Jane Fonda. One, two, three…

CHIDEYA: And that's our aerobics show for today. Thanks for sharing your time with us. To listen to the show or subscribe to our podcast, visit npr.org/newsandnotes. And now, you can join the conversation, thanks to our new blog, News And Views. Just check out the link at the top of our Web page. NEWS AND NOTES was created by NPR News and the African-American Public Radio Consortium. Tomorrow, we look at the 10 best cities fro African-Americans.

Mr. AVALON: (Rapping) Let me see you do the Jane Fonda. Five, six, seven, now, if you don't know, let me show you how to work it out…

CHIDEYA: I'm Farai Chideya. This is NEWS & NOTES.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.