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MICHEL MARTIN, host:

And finally we remember one of the founding fathers of American gospel music. David Pop Winans, who died last week at the age of 74, is being remembered today in Detroit as patriarch of perhaps the most popular family in gospel music. Fifty-five years ago David married Delores Mom Winans, 10 children were born to that union. Little did Pop know that the Winans would one day be, in many circles, a household name performing and celebrating the gospel as a family group in duos and as soloists. TELL ME MORE recently caught up with Reverend Marvin Winans, a member of the hit gospel music group, the Winans.

Reverend MARVIN WINANS (Member, Gospel music group "The Winans"): He was our hero long before anyone knew who we were, simply because when we first signed with Crouch Productions, and we were a part of Crouch Productions - well, we could never get a date as to when we would go into the studio to record. And so Dad just couldn't take it no more and he said we're going to California. And they'll have to record when we're on the doorstep. And when we showed up, then they said well okay, and we got into the studio and that's how "The Question Is" came.

(Soundbite of song "The Question Is")

THE WINANS (Singer): (singing) Now, the question is, will I do his will? And it's yes, yes, yes, whoa, yes…

MARTIN: After launching their careers, Pop watched as his sons went on to win six Grammy awards as the Winans and became one of the most popular gospel quartets of all time. And other Winans groups followed: BB & CC, Angie & Debbie, even the grandkids started a singing group. But as a preacher and singer in his own right, it also brought David Winans joy to share the mic with his children. Here's Pop Winans singing "If I Labor" with the Winans.

(Soundbite of the song "If I Labor")

Mr. DAVID POP WINANS (Musician): (singing) If I labor, God is gonna give me a crown, yes he will, a crown. If I labor, God is gonna give me a crown, yes he will, a crown. No. I believe I'll work in the vineyard. Sun is going down.

MARTIN: Whether on stage or off, son Marvin said his father, who once worked as a taxi cab driver and a barber, never craved the spotlight, although Pop had a hard time avoiding it.

Rev. WINANS: My father was not a man that sought the light. He was very humble and he would rather push us out there than for us to have him out there. And when I look at his name scrolling at the bottom of ABC and NBC morning shows, Pop Winans, I just smiled and said he never knew. He never knew and he would have never taken any of the credit to himself. He would've just said give God the glory.

MARTIN: David Pop Winans Sr. died last Wednesday in Nashville, Tennessee. He was 74. Friends and family gather to celebrate the life of Pop Winans in his hometown of Detroit today.

(Soundbite of song, "Ain't No Need To Worry")

Mr. WINANS (Musician): (Singing) Ain't no need in worrying, what the night is gonna bring, it'll be all over in the morning…

MARTIN: Marvin Winans sat down to talk with our Web producer Lee Hill. Today on our Web site you can hear an extended version of that conversation. Just log on to npr.org and click on TELL ME MORE.

(Soundbite of song, "Ain't No Need To Worry")

Mr. WINANS (Musician): (Singing) It'll be all over in the morning…

MARTIN: And that's our program for today, I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Let's talk more tomorrow.

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