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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Finally this hour, Coldplay is one of the bestselling bands in the world, but Coldplay has a nagging problem. Not one, not two, but three other artists charged the band with plagiarism on its hit song, "Viva La Vida." Are the charges legit? Well, our commentator and humorist, Brian Unger, has this less than scientific audio analysis.

BRIAN UNGER: Coldplay's latest accuser is Yusuf Islam, more familiar as Cat Stevens, who claims Coldplay's "Viva La Vida" borrows from his "Foreigner Suite," released in 1973. Let's investigate. First, Cat Stevens' "Foreigner Suite."

(Soundbite of song, "Foreigner Suite")

UNGER: And here, the ubiquitous "Viva La Vida" from Coldplay.

(Soundbite of song, "Viva La Vida")

Mr. CHRIS MARTIN (Singer): (Singing) I used to rile the world. Seas would rise when I gave the word.

UNGER: Meanwhile, Yusuf Islam needs to get in line behind guitarist Joe Satriani, who has already filed a legal claim against Coldplay for copying his masterpiece, "If I Could Fly," released in 2004.

(Soundbite of song, "If I Could Fly")

UNGER: That's "If I Could Fly." And "Viva La Vida"?

(Soundbite of song, "Viva La Vida")

Mr. MARTIN: (Singing) Be my mirror my soul and shield. My missionaries in a foreign field.

UNGER: Here's what we know. Coldplay may or may not have stolen from Joe Satriani and may or may not have stolen from Yusuf Islam, who took his name from himself, Cat Stevens.

Meanwhile, Cat Stevens, now Yusuf Islam, and Joe Satriani, still Joe Satriani, need to get in line behind the band Creaky Boards, who first claimed Coldplay based their song "Viva La Vida" on a song released last year, called "The Songs I Didn't Write." Ironic? Yes. Stealing? Let's listen to Creaky Boards.

(Soundbite of song, "The Songs I Didn't Write")

Mr. ANDREW HOEPFNER (Singer): (Singing) It would have made me crack what would have fallen from your eye…

UNGER: Now once again, "Vida La Vida."

(Soundbite of song, "Vida La Vida")

Mr. MARTIN: (Singing) It was the wicked wild wind. Blew down the doors to let me in.

UNGER: And here's Satriani again.

(Soundbite of song, "If I Could Fly")

UNGER: And here's Cat Stevens, now Yusuf Islam.

(Soundbite of song, "Foreigner Suite")

Mr. CAT STEVENS (Singer): (Singing) I've seen many other girls before.

UNGER: As a refresher, Coldplay:

(Soundbite of song, "Viva La Vida")

Mr. MARTIN: (Singing) Hear Jerusalem bells...

UNGER: Creaky Boards.

(Soundbite of song, "The Songs I Didn't Write")

UNGER: Satriani.

(Soundbite of song, "If I Could Fly")

UNGER: Creaky Boards.

(Soundbite of song, "The Songs I Didn't Write")

Mr. HOEPFNER: (Singing) All over town.

UNGER: Coldplay.

(Soundbite of song, "Vida La Vida")

Mr. MARTIN: (Singing) One minute I held…

UNGER: Stevens, Now Islam.

(Soundbite of song, "Foreigner Suite")

Mr. STEVENS: (Singing) (Unintelligible).

UNGER: Creaky Boards.

(Soundbite of song, "The Songs I Didn't Write")

Mr. HOEPFNER: (Singing) …the songs that I didn't write.

UNGER: Coldplay.

(Soundbite of song, "Vida La Vida")

Mr. MARTIN: (Singing) (Unintelligible).

UNGER: And Luciano Pavarotti.

(Soundbite of music)

Mr. LUCIANO PAVAROTTI (Singer): (Singing) (Speaking foreign language).

UNGER: He will serve as our control group, and finally, all of them at once.

(Soundbite of music)

UNGER: Clearly, someone is stealing from someone, but why isn't Yusuf Islam calling out Creaky Boards? Why aren't Creaky Boards going after Satriani? Why isn't Satriani going after the whole lot of them? However this Coldplay kerfuffle plays out, this is going to be a much needed boost that so many laid-off copyright attorneys have been desperately waiting for.

NORRIS: That's humorist Brian Unger with his musical take on plagiarism charges against the British band, Coldplay. If you want to do your own audio analysis, you can find all the songs you just heard at nprmusic.org.

(Soundbite of song, "Vida La Vida")

SIEGEL: You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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