Copyright ©2007 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

And now an update to a story we brought to you last week.

(Soundbite of "Britain's Got Talent")

ALEX COHEN, host:

That's Paul Potts singing "Nessun Dorma." The chubby car phone salesman in the cheap suit singing his way to English hearts on the television contest, "Britain's Got Talent."

BRAND: Paul had made it through the semi-finals when I spoke to him last Friday.

If you win, will you go back to being a cell phone salesman?

Mr. PAUL POTTS (Contestant): I don't think so. I don't think so. Certainly not from, you know, the reactions I've been getting, nobody's expecting me back.

Mr. SHANE CONWAY (Spokesman, The Carphone Warehouse): He hasn't returned to work, no, and to be perfectly honest, now that his career has taken off so dramatically, I'm not too sure that he will.

COHEN: That's Shane Conway, spokesman for Paul Potts's former employer, Carphone Warehouse, speaking with us this morning.

BRAND: And Paul Potts's career is taking off. He won the show's finale last night.

(Soundbite of "Britain's Got Talent")

Unidentified Man: Would you like to say something to all the millions of people out there who voted for you?

Mr. POTTS: Just thank you for believing in me. It's just absolutely bonkers.

COHEN: Paul Potts won nearly $200,000, and now he gets to sing for the queen.

(Soundbite of singing)

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.