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LIANE HANSEN, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Liane Hansen.

And joining us is puzzlemaster Will Shortz. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ: Hi, Liane.

HANSEN: Will, the challenge you gave us last week had people thinking about cricket. They had people thinking about hats. Remind us of that challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from listener Rick Rubenstein of Sunnyvale, California. I said: Think of two words that each mean bowler. Put them together, one after the other and you'll name a sport that is not related to bowling. What is it?

HANSEN: What is it?

SHORTZ: It is roller derby.

HANSEN: We love it. I love it. We received about 1,500 entries this week. And from the correct entries, our randomly selected winner is Alice Veneziani of Riverton, New Jersey. Hi, Alice.

Ms. ALICE VENEZIANI: Hi, Liane.

(Soundbite of laughter)

HANSEN: I can…

Ms. VENEZIANI: Hi, Will.

SHORTZ: Hey, there.

HANSEN: I can say your name, but I stumble over your town. I mean, that…

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. VENEZIANI: That's okay.

HANSEN: How long did it take you to solve the puzzle?

Ms. VENEZIANI: Well, it was one of those puzzles, when I heard the word bowler, I immediately thought a derby and it just popped right into my head almost immediately.

HANSEN: Well, it sounds like you're ready to play today.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Yes I am.

HANSEN: All right. Well…

Ms. VENEZIANI: Real happy.

HANSEN: Alice, meet Will. Let's play.

SHORTZ: Hi, Alice. I'm going to give you a clue for a six-letter word. Drop the first letter and read the remaining letters backward, you'll get a five-letter word that answers my second clue. For example, if I said flower parts and roofing material, you would say petals and slate. Remove the P of petals and read the rest backward, you get slate.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Got it.

SHORTZ: Number one is to state positively and a lock of hair. Think of what a lock of hair is in five letters, a long lock of hair.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Tress?

SHORTZ: Yes.

Ms. VENEZIANI: And…

HANSEN: Oh, assert.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Assert.

SHORTZ: Assert. There you go.

HANSEN: Woo, working backwards.

SHORTZ: All right.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Woo.

SHORTZ: You can go at it either direction.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Okay.

SHORTZ: Here's number two: A hotel employee who carries bags and like old fashions that are in again.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Bellboy? No that's seven letters.

SHORTZ: No.

Ms. VENEZIANI: A porter?

SHORTZ: Yes.

Ms. VENEZIANI: And - Liane, help me. Porter.

HANSEN: Retro.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Retro.

SHORTZ: Retro. Like old fashions that are in again.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Right.

SHORTZ: Good. Here's your next one: calamitous, and your second clue is a prop for Groucho Marx.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Cigar?

SHORTZ: Yes. Okay, reverse that and put a letter in front of it.

HANSEN: Tragic.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Right.

SHORTZ: Tragic is calamitous. Good. All right, here's your next one: A big number, and your second clue is section in a supermarket with milk and butter.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Dairy.

SHORTZ: Yes.

HANSEN: Okay, let's spell that backwards.

SHORTZ: And put a letter in…

Ms. VENEZIANI: Myriad?

SHORTZ: Put a…

Ms. VENEZIANI: Myriad.

SHORTZ: Myriad. Good job. All right. Your first clue is attic, and the second clue is Latin for earth.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Terra.

SHORTZ: Yes. And an attic?

Ms. VENEZIANI: An attic is a garret.

SHORTZ: Garret. Nice job. The lowest part and all for one and one for all, for example.

Ms. VENEZIANI: A motto.

SHORTZ: Yes. And lowest part?

Ms. VENEZIANI: Bottom.

SHORTZ: Bottom, yes.

HANSEN: Fast.

Ms. VENEZIANI: I'm getting better.

HANSEN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: You're getting faster.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Improving.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SHORTZ: All right, try this one. A leftist European political party.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Okay.

SHORTZ: And your second clue is the look on a villain's face.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Sneer?

SHORTZ: Yes. And what's that party? They start…

HANSEN: Oh, yeah. What were you going to say, Alice?

Ms. VENEZIANI: Greens?

HANSEN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: The Greens, yes. And here's your last one. The first clue is means -and it's a two-word phrase, means or signifies, and your second clue is one of the five senses.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Smell?

SHORTZ: Not that one. Try another.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. VENEZIANI: Vision. Taste?

SHORTZ: Taste. Yes. Yes. Okay, reverse taste and your answer is means in two words.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Means.

SHORTZ: Yeah.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Gets at?

SHORTZ: Gets at. Good job.

HANSEN: Good job, Alice.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. VENEZIANI: You know, this was so much fun.

HANSEN: It was. Well, now we have something for you. It's time to let you know what you'll take away for playing with us today. And our special guest, who's actually here in the studio, when I tell you his official title, it's not going to sound too impressive. But earlier this summer, he crowd-surfed his way onto the stage to sing with the band Green Day. Check out his claim to fame.

(Soundbite of song, "Longview")

GREEN DAY (Band): (Singing) Peel me off this Velcro seat and get me moving. I sure as hell can't do it by myself.

Mr. BRENT BAUGHMAN: Nothing is sacred on the Internet.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. BAUGHMAN: Oh, my gosh. Hi, Alice. Sorry I'm your celebrity. I'm Brent, the intern here at WEEKEND EDITION.

Okay, Alice, for playing the puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, the 11th Edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and Thesaurus. I need to grab one of those before school starts next week, actually. The Scrabble Deluxe Edition from Parker Brothers, which my roommate in Boston and I loved to play - hi, Kate. The "Puzzlemaster Presents" from Random House Volume 2. Will Shortz's latest book series, "Will Shortz Presents KenKen," Volumes 1 and 2 and 3 from St. Martin's Press. Even though, as a humanity student, those are hard for me because they involve math. And one of Will Shortz's "Puzzlemaster Decks of Riddles and Challenges" from Chronicle Books.

HANSEN: Our intern, Brent Bauchman.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Wow, thank so you much.

HANSEN: Before you go, Alice…

Ms. VENEZIANI: Sure.

HANSEN: Tell us what member station you listen to.

Ms. VENEZIANI: I listen to WHYY in sunny, Philadelphia.

HANSEN: All righty. Alice Veneziani of Riverton, New Jersey, thanks so much for playing our puzzle today.

Ms. VENEZIANI: Thank you.

HANSEN: All right, Will, we need a challenge for next week.

SHORTZ: Yes. Name a famous leader in world history — the name by which this person is usually known. Change the first letter of the leader's name to the previous letter of the alphabet, rearrange the result, and you'll name what this person was the leader of. Who was it? And where was this person the leader?

So, again, a famous leader in world history, it's the usual name for this person. Change the first letter to the previous letter of the alphabet, rearrange the result, and you'll name what this person was the leader of. Who is it, and where was this person the leader?

HANSEN: When you have the answer, go to our Web site npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Only one entry per person, please. Our deadline is Thursday 3 p.m., Eastern Time, please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time - we'll call you if you're the winner and you'll get to play Puzzle on the Air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster Will Shortz. Thanks a lot, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Liane.

HANSEN: And Brent Baughman, thanks to you and good luck when you go back to Emerson College.

Mr. BAUGHMAN: Thank you, Liane, for a great summer.

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