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Seeing Through The Eyes Of An Armadillo

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Seeing Through The Eyes Of An Armadillo

Seeing Through The Eyes Of An Armadillo

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  • Transcript

(Soundbite of music)

JOE PALCA, host:

And now for the lightning round of Video Pick of the Week.

(Soundbite of laughter)

FLORA LICHTMAN: Hi, Joe.

PALCA: Flora Lichtman has joined us. And we don't have much time, but Flora, you have a good one this week. I've seen it.

LICHTMAN: It's a good one. It is the homage to the crittercam. If you've ever wondered what it looks like to see through the eyes of an armadillo or ride on the back of an alligator…

PALCA: You know, I have to say before today I had never wondered what it looks like to see through the eyes of an armadillo.

LICHTMAN: But you didn't know what you are missing, right?

PALCA: I didn't, no. This is - I mean, if you see this armadillo, you'll suddenly have a new respect for what it means to see the ground up close.

LICHTMAN: That's true. I mean, it's pretty amazing footage. The artist is Sam Easterson. And you can check out a compilation of some of his work and hear about how he did it on our Web site at sciencefriday.com.

PALCA: Definitely worth it, and even the best - and Flora hasn't told you this, but stay tuned for the owl.

LICHTMAN: Yes.

PALCA: The owl is awesome.

LICHTMAN: The owl comes to the end.

PALCA: I'm not going to tell you any more than that.

(Soundbite of laughter)

PALCA: You just have to go and look for the owl. Flora, thanks very much.

LICHTMAN: Thanks, Joe.

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