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MADELEINE BRAND, host:

Our last story today is more than a little creepy and it may not be suitable for children. It's about pro-wrestler Chris Benoit. Benoit killed his wife and 7-year-old son last weekend. He placed Bibles next to their bodies and then he hung himself in his Atlanta home. Fourteen hours before police arrived, someone reported his wife's death on Wikipedia. The address of the computer that sent the message has been traced to Stamford, Connecticut. That's where Benoit's employer, World Wrestling Entertainment, is based.

Here to talk about this mystery is Bryan Alvarez. He is a pro-wrestler, and he's also co-host of a wrestling show on Sirius Satellite Radio. Welcome to the program.

Mr. BRYAN ALVAREZ (Editor, Figure Four Weekly) Thanks for having me.

BRAND: What exactly does the Wikipedia entry say?

Mr. ALVAREZ: It read that Chris Benoit was replaced by Johnny Nitro for the ECW Championship match at Vengeance, as Benoit was not there due to personal issues stemming from the death of his wife Nancy.

BRAND: Now, we've just learned that an anonymous user who has the same IP address that posted that entry has confessed to posting it.

Mr. ALVAREZ: Yes.

BRAND: Tell us about that.

Mr. ALVAREZ: When I first heard this, I knew pretty much immediately that it was probably vandalism, because this person with this IP address had vandalized a number of different wrestling entries. And it was a lot of very obscene stuff. And when this came out, it was pretty clear that WWE had announced on television that Benoit was not there due to a family emergency. And Benoit never missed shows. And apparently a lot of people in the Internet were speculating why he would miss this and what the family emergency would be, and somebody suggested perhaps his wife died. And so this person just went in Wikipedia and wrote his wife died. And as it turns out, that ended up being the case.

BRAND: So it's definitely this person who wrote that message.

Mr. ALVAREZ: Yeah. I'd say it's about 100 percent it's that person that wrote that message. And he said there was about one in 10,000 chance of this happening, but as a vandal, I think the chances, you know, it was a coincidence but not a gigantic coincidence.

BRAND: Okay, something also disturbing. Benoit apparently sent text and cell phone messages apparently after he had killed his wife and son.

Mr. ALVAREZ: Yeah. They think that he sent about six text messages total. I think three messages to two different people on Saturday night - or Sunday morning at about 3:50 AM. And this was probably right before he committed suicide. And the text messages talked about, you know, my dogs are out. You know, just strange information. Nothing like I've killed my wife or anything like that. But I've been told there are other messages that have not been made public yet that perhaps quoted biblical passages, had estate information. So I think more is going to come out as it pertains to the text messages.

BRAND: And meanwhile, there is an investigation into whether steroids played a role in the killings. What can you tell about that?

Mr. ALVAREZ: Apparently, there are going to be perhaps some federal investigations as far as this is concerned, just information on, you know, perhaps prescriptions being, you know, given to a guy for stuff you're not allowed to prescribe and that sort of thing. So there will be more coming out of this.

BRAND: Is there a big problem with steroids in the business?

Mr. ALVAREZ: There is a major problem with steroids, as the Benoit story is probably going make very clear when the toxicology reports come back.

BRAND: Okay, Bryan Alvarez, thank you very much.

Mr. ALVAREZ: Thanks you very much.

BRAND: Bryan Alvarez is the editor of Figure Four Weekly, a pro-wrestler newsletter and he's co-host of wrestling observing - I'm sorry. He's co-host of "Wrestling Observer Live" on Sirius Satellite Radio.

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