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'Weird Al' Yankovic's Ode To The Trashmen
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'Weird Al' Yankovic's Ode To The Trashmen
'Weird Al' Yankovic's Ode To The Trashmen
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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Weird Al Yankovic has made a career out of spoofing popular hits. He transformed Michael Jackson's �Beat It� into �Eat It.� �Gangsters Paradise� became �Amish Paradise.� And �I Love Rocky Road� was his joke version of �I Love Rock and Roll.� Well, Weird Al does love rock and roll and we asked him to recommend some music for our series You Must Hear This.

Mr. WEIRD AL YANKOVIC (Musician): For me, and for a lot of people like me, popular music has a way of defining a particular decade or a particular year. For example, when many people think of the year 1964, they think of the British Invasion: the Beatles dominating the record charts, historic performances on �The Ed Sullivan Show.�

Well, not to take anything away from the Fab Four, but when I think of 1964, I can only think of one defining moment - the emergence of a powerful, unstoppable musical force, a group of young lads from Minneapolis known collectively as The Trashmen.

(Soundbite of song, �Surfing Bird�)

Mr. DAL WINSLOW (Musician, The Trashmen): (Singing) A-well-a, everybody's heard about the bird. Bird, bird, bird, b-bird's the word. A-well-a, bird, bird, bird, the bird�

Mr. YANKOVIC: Not only were The Trashmen arguably the best surf band ever to come out of Minneapolis, but with their 1964 hit "Surfing Bird," they did something that no other band before or since has ever truly done. They stripped rock and roll to its very core. They peeled back the layers of the onion of rock.

(Soundbite of song, �Surfing Bird�)

Mr. WINSLOW: (Singing) Pa-ooma-mow-mow. Papa-ooma-mow-mow. Papa-ooma-mow-mow, papa-ooma-mow-mow�

Mr. YANKOVIC: �Surfing Bird� was inarguably loud, dumb and pointless. It was absolutely everything that was great about rock and roll distilled into one song. Also � and this is no small feat � I think that this song finally, once and for all, conclusively proved that the bird was, in fact, the word. If you didn't believe it by the end of the first verse, there was certainly little doubt left in your mind by the bridge.

(Soundbite of song, �Surfing Bird�)

Mr. WINSLOW: (Singing)

Mr. YANKOVIC: This song was and continues to be a personal inspiration for me. Whenever I write a song, whether it's a heart-wrenching love ballad or a food based song parody, I always take a moment to contemplate: What would The Trashmen do?

True, I could never deceive myself into thinking that I could possibly match their genius or their gravitas, but artists need something to strive for � a beacon of perfection to guide their way. By equating the bird with the word, loudly and repeatedly, The Trashmen proved conclusively why they deserve to be immortalized in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Although, let's face it, they never will be. No stinking chance.

(Soundbite of song, �Surfing Bird�)

Mr. WINSLOW: (Singing) Well, don't you know about the bird? Well, everybody knows that the bird is the word, A-well-a, bird, bird, b-bird is a word, papa-ooma-mow-mow�

BLOCK: That was Weird Al Yankovic with his recommendation for a series You Must Hear This.

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