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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Another trade dispute between the United States and China is the subject of today's last word in business. And that last word is forbidden. That's what China told Starbucks in the Forbidden City. We reported several months ago that a Chinese TV anchor was campaigning to get Starbucks out of the world heritage site in Beijing. He said the presence of an American chain and the symbol of the Chinese nation was trampling on Chinese culture. Over the weekend, Starbucks closed its store in the Forbidden City. So score a point for Chinese national pride. Although coffee lovers will not have to travel very far to find the next Starbucks outlet, because there are more than 200 on the Chinese mainland, not to mention all the imitation Starbucks.

This is the real business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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